New Source

Evans, S. E., Steel, A. L., & DiLillo, D. (2013). Child maltreatment severity and adult trauma symptoms: Does perceived social support play a buffering role?.Child abuse & neglect37(11), 934-943.

Article Independent Analysis

Evans, Steel and DiLillo (2013) is yet another research effort providing an insight into gender differences in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) associated with childhood trauma among adults. This article is of importance to my project in the sense that it explains the differential impact of perceived social support from family and friends in predicting PTSD among men and women and these findings may be extended to conclude to some extent about the spousal support. There are several key concepts discussed in this article, which support my research questions. For example, one key concept that is more relevant to my project is the diminishing impact of perceived social support from family with increasing severity of childhood maltreatment among women. Another key concept is that men derive more benefit from perceived social support in the form of reduced trauma symptoms, which supports the research questions about beneficial impact of positive social support for men, and harm of negative social support from their wives. Another key concept by Evans et, al, (2013) also explains why impact of perceived social support diminishes for women with more severe childhood maltreatments. These key concepts will help build as well as explain major key concepts in my project.

Evans et. al (2013) relates to Evans et. al (2014) partially in its purpose. Both analyzed the differential impacts of social support in predicting PTSD based on gender. However, Evans et. al (2014) was specific to impacts of spousal support while this particular article discusses both supports from family and friends and not specifically spouse. On the other hand, one focuses the role of perceived social support while the other analyzes actual social support. However, both found stronger impact of social support in predicting PTSD among males as compared to females.

Cutrona (1996) seems to be an interesting source, as indicated by an online excerpt from this book. Cutrona (1996) focuses social support in the context of spousal relationship and hence may provide interesting facts about spousal support and its impacts related to stress and PTSD. However, it will only be clarified upon complete reading which is not completely available online.

Reference

Cutrona, C. (1996). Social support in couples: Marriage as a resource in times of stress. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Evans, S. E., Steel, A. L., Watkins, L. E., & DiLillo, D. (2014). Childhood exposure to family violence and adult trauma symptoms: The importance of social support from a spouse. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy6(5), 527.

Evans, S. E., Steel, A. L., & DiLillo, D. (2013). Child maltreatment severity and adult trauma symptoms: Does perceived social support play a buffering role?.Child abuse & neglect37(11), 934-943.