SOCY 1011 Exam 4 Part 1

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How can the study of feral (wild) children on the one hand, and identical twins on the other, help to clarify the debate over the relative influence of nature versus nurture in the socialization process?

Feral children are children who have virtually no contact with the human society and may grow in isolation. Tarzan, a fictional character is one of the example of such children. These children can help us know about the influence of human nature on human psychology. We might not be able to see a lot of social skills in such children but we can definitely observe their natural instincts of love and affection for other living things. The fundamental of human characteristics that are present at birth can be studied with such studies. Identical twin studies can also be handy in studying the extent of nature or nurture on human beings. In such studies m identical twins are separated in childhood and a comparison of their behavior is made after certain years to know the influence of their different environments and how does it effected their natural characteristics. Such studies can be helpful in learning about the development of human emotions with same DNA but different environments.

 

According to early social psychologists, the acquisition of language through interaction is the most important vehicle for successful human socialization.

 

True

False

 

Which of the following best describes the process of socialization?

Mentally assuming the perspective of another.
Striving to impose a dominant culture on a subordinated group.
Discarding former behavior patterns and accepting new ones as part of a transition in one’s life.
Learning the attitudes, values, and behaviors appropriate for members of a particular culture.

 

Most sociologists conclude that nature influences us more than nurture.

 

True

False

 

According to activity theory, both the elderly and society can benefit:

if the elderly remain physically active but refrain from too much social activity
if the elderly remain socially active but do not tax themselves physically
if elderly people remain socially active as long as they can
if elderly people retire from their jobs so that the younger generations can fill them

 

 

Which of the following is considered an agent of socialization?

 

media
peers
churches
all of the above

 

George Herbert Mead refers to the part of our self that reflects internalized community norms as

the looking-glass self.
the game stage.
the generalized other or the ‘Me.’
the ‘I.’

 

Which of the following is true about Cooley’s theory of the looking-glass self?

It describes the interaction between the ‘I’ and the ‘Me.’
It argues that personality is biologically determined.
It is a theory that we become who we are based on how we imagine others see and judge us.
All of the answers are correct.

 

Humans cannot be socialized without:

regular social interaction with others
proper medical treatment
educated parents who are familiar with theories of child psychology
two parents: a mother and a father

 

When discussing human socialization, “nature” refers to

 

Human biology, genetics, and physiology that shapes us as individuals
The social environment we grow up in that shapes us as individuals
Interaction with animals, and how this shapes us as individuals
All of the above

 

Mores can be defined as

 

Norms that have been written down and specify punishments for violators
Generally understood norms that are not written down in law or policy
Norms governing everyday behavior
Norms deemed highly necessary to the welfare of a society

 

Which of the following is a good example of cultural lag?

Confusion about the “rules” for smart phone use in public
Older people feeling left behind or incompetent with new technologies
Consumers feeling confused when asked to order from a screen instead of a person
All of these

 

Which of the following is true about the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis?

It argues that language is biologically determined.
It argues that the primary role of language is to describe reality.
It argues that language shapes what we perceive and think.
It argues that thought precedes language.

 

Normative culture refers to

 

Our mental and symbolic representations of reality
Common practices and beliefs shared by all societies
Our physical modification of the natural environment to suit our purposes
The ways in which we establish, abide by, and enforce principles of conduct

 

Which of the following concepts describes viewing and judging people’s behavior from the perspective of their (the people’s) culture?

ethnocentrism.
cultural relativism.
cultural lag.
cultural integration.

 

The sociological purpose of a breaching experiment is to

 

Unsettle people so they will respond in various ways
To sanction people for breaking social norms
Reveal underlying taken-for-granted everyday social norms
To shock people or make them laugh

 

 

Formal norms can be defined as

 

Norms that have been written down and specify punishments for violators
Norms deemed highly necessary to the welfare of a society
Norms governing everyday behavior
Generally understood norms that are not written down in law or policy

 

Subculture can be defined as

 

A population that is bounded by political-geographical borders and characterized by regularized human interactions
A subset of people within a larger group whose ways of life are different than the main group
A group of people within a larger group whose purpose is to challenge the status quo
Everything humans create in establishing our relationships with nature and each other, such as language, music, traditions, etc.

 

 

Material culture refers to

 

Common practices and beliefs shared by all societies
The ways in which we establish, abide by, and enforce principles of conduct
Our physical modification of the natural environment to suit our purposes
Our mental and symbolic representations of reality

 

 

Society can be defined as

 

Everything humans create in establishing our relationships with nature and each other, such as language, music, traditions, etc.
A group of people within a larger group whose purpose is to challenge the status quo
A population that is bounded by political-geographical borders and characterized by regularized human interactions
A subset of people within a larger group whose ways of life are different than the main group

 

 

While attending a prestigious lecture at a New York City museum, Cassie noisily belches several times and picks her nose. She is violating:

laws.
folkways.
mores.
formal norms.