WebQuest Introduction, Overview, & Resources

WebQuests (WQ) are sound, well researched additions to learning activity plans (LAPs). WebQuests were originally designed as a means for space-bound (i.e., physical classroom environments) teachers and students to access content beyond local resources, such as textbooks, school libraries, and isolated communities. Thus, the primary feature within a WQ are “resources” that are Internet-based. Dr. Bernie Dodge of San Diego State University saw WQs as an option that could assure both teachers and parents that learners would be accessing safe and educationally-vetted websites under the supervision of trained educators.

In addition, WebQuests were designed as both independent and collaborative/cooperative learning opportunities. This design, as envisioned by Dodge, encouraged students to take responsibility for their own learning while encouraging skills in important school-to-work capabilities — that of collaboration and cooperation.

To learn more about WebQuests, peruse the following resources by Tom March, a colleague to Bernie Dodge:

What WebQuests Are (Really)

The Learning Power of WebQuests

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/webquests/index.html

To see examples of WebQuests, tread with caution … some websites allow those activities labeled as “WebQuests” to be reposited with little (or any) evaluation process for content, alignment to standards, design, or rules of grammar and readability. I have included a short list of examples and competent repositories below, but you should use your own critical insight to determine if they are worthy of your use. I always recommend that you adapt and revise to be certain the WQ completely aligns with your teaching/learning environment and the diversity within your targeted audience!

http://zunal.com/index.php

http://webquest.org/

http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/archives/webquest.shtml

http://teacherweb.com/tweb/webquests.aspx

http://questgarden.com/author/examplestop.php

 

Introduction, Overview, & Resources

WebQuests (WQ) are sound, well researched additions to learning activity plans (LAPs). WebQuests were originally designed as a means for space-bound (i.e., physical classroom environments) teachers and students to access content beyond local resources, such as textbooks, school libraries, and isolated communities. Thus, the primary feature within a WQ are “resources” that are Internet-based. Dr. Bernie Dodge of San Diego State University saw WQs as an option that could assure both teachers and parents that learners would be accessing safe and educationally-vetted websites under the supervision of trained educators.

In addition, WebQuests were designed as both independent and collaborative/cooperative learning opportunities. This design, as envisioned by Dodge, encouraged students to take responsibility for their own learning while encouraging skills in important school-to-work capabilities — that of collaboration and cooperation.

To learn more about WebQuests, peruse the following resources by Tom March, a colleague to Bernie Dodge:

What WebQuests Are (Really)

The Learning Power of WebQuests

http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/webquests/index.html

To see examples of WebQuests, tread with caution … some websites allow those activities labeled as “WebQuests” to be reposited with little (or any) evaluation process for content, alignment to standards, design, or rules of grammar and readability. I have included a short list of examples and competent repositories below, but you should use your own critical insight to determine if they are worthy of your use. I always recommend that you adapt and revise to be certain the WQ completely aligns with your teaching/learning environment and the diversity within your targeted audience!

http://zunal.com/index.php

http://webquest.org/

http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/archives/webquest.shtml

http://teacherweb.com/tweb/webquests.aspx

http://questgarden.com/author/examplestop.php